Marketing with Happiness has become Social Medias Specialty

Posted by | January 06, 2011 | Marketing, Social Media | 4 Comments

powerful story has always been one of the most effective ways to find marketing success. As marketers, we purposely position our messages in ways that will evoke a variety of different emotions. To be blunt, Marketers love it when consumers are unhappy. Unhappiness is actually one of the driving factors behind successful marketing.

A year ago a friend of mine purchased a 2007 Volkswagen Jetta. They did a happy dance in the car lot and wouldn’t stop talking about how much fun they were having behind the wheel. A week later their brother bought a 2009 Porsche. The excitement and moon-walks of the Jetta owner quickly came to an end.

You see, what you have doesn’t make you unhappy. What you want does.

Recognizing this, marketers are constantly coming up with ways to make consumers want more. The challenge for many of us, is keeping consumers satisfied with their brands once we have them hooked to ensure that they don’t leave for the competition. This all seems a little heartless to think that marketers prey on the unhappy. But for the past several years, it’s been true. That is, until social media unleashed a new opportunity in which marketers can plant happiness into the lives of consumers.

KLM Airline recently caught on to the power of happiness in marketing. Found on the Digital Buzz Blog:

Remember how great it felt the first time you got a social response from a brand you love or business you deal with? All the good will generated by their speedy response? Well, KLM decided to run an experiment with it’s social community, for people who check in via foursquare for flights or tweet about waiting to board the next KLM service, and they called it “KLM Surprise” a campaign that aims to bring random surprises and happiness to the boring wait for flights. (Via Digital Buzz Blog)

Take a look at your marketing and social media efforts. Are you preying on the unhappy or making someones day?

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